An analysis of Psychological Issues during Menopause and its integrative management

  • Sholly Elizabeth Kuruvilla First Year Post Graduate Scholar, Dept. of Swasthavritha and Yoga, KAHER'S Shri BM Kankanavadi Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya, Belagavi, Karnataka, India.
  • Sandeep S Sagare Reader, Dept. of Swasthavritha and Yoga, KAHER'S Shri BM Kankanavadi Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya, Belagavi, Karnataka, India.
Keywords: Menopause, Psychological symptoms, Integrative management

Abstract

Menopause is indeed a normal physiological stage in a woman's life, typically occurring in the late 40s to early 50s, although the exact timing can vary from person to person. This transitional phase is frequently associated with a spectrum of physical, mental and cognitive symptoms. During the menopausal transition, many women commonly encounter physical symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, irregular menstruation, sleep disturbances, depletion of bone health, weight gain and a decrease in sexual desire. Additionally, this phase can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels which can precipitate mental issues like mood swings, anger and irritability, heightened anxiety, loss of self-esteem, loss of confidence, low mood and feelings of sadness or depression. Memory and cognitive changes like forgetfulness and difficulty in concentration are often reported during menopause, sometimes referred to as "brain fog" or "menopausal cognitive impairment." For some, these symptoms serve as early indicators of the onset of this life transition. Integrative management of mental health problems during menopause involves a holistic approach that combines conventional medical treatments with complementary and alternative therapies to address both the physical and emotional aspects of menopausal symptoms. It includes stress reduction techniques, lifestyle modifications, counselling and psychotherapy, dietary supplements, internal- external medications and regular health care check-ups. Many women consider menopause as inherently a negative experience as it comes with various challenges and symptoms. Seeking medical advice and support can help women navigate this transition more smoothly and positively.

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CITATION
DOI: 10.21760/jaims.8.12.14
Published: 2024-01-31
How to Cite
KuruvillaS. E., & Sandeep S Sagare. (2024). An analysis of Psychological Issues during Menopause and its integrative management. Journal of Ayurveda and Integrated Medical Sciences, 8(12), 101 - 104. https://doi.org/10.21760/jaims.8.12.14
Section
Review Article